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Re: [casi] more 'stupid' iraqis



Well picked up Sander.

There is a real problem with 'embedded' journalists. The broadcasters
should qualify any reports from them.

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/wnt/World/iraq_safwan030322.html

has a good article by John Donvan where he highlights this issue:

> Doubts and Questions
> Slow Aid and Other Concerns Fuel Iraqi Discontent Toward United States
>
> By John Donvan

> S A F W A N, Iraq, March 22  They were unforgettable images:
> Residents of this southern Iraqi town openly welcoming coalition
> forces. They danced in the streets as a picture of Saddam Hussein was
> torn down.

>  Liberated Iraqis Doubt U.S. Motives

> That was yesterday.
> Traveling unescorted into Safwan today, I got a far different picture.
> Rather than affection and appreciation, I saw a lot of hostility
> toward the coalition forces, the United States and President Bush.
>
> Some were even directed towards the media. (It was the first time I
> heard somebody refer to me as a "Satan.")
>
> To be sure, conversations with people on the street here begin
> relatively calmly. But the more they talked, the angrier they got.
>
> In part, much of their discontent stems from the unknown. In speaking
> with them, the newly-liberated Iraqis ask the same questions that seem
> to nag many outside Iraq.
>
> Why are you here in this country? Are you trying to take over? Are you
> going to take our country forever? Are the Israelis coming next? Are
> you here to steal our oil? When are you going to get out?
>
>
> Show Us the Aid
>
> But also fueling the simmering animosity among Iraqis here is the lack
> of physical aid and comfort, promised by the United States before the
> conflict began.
>
> The U.S. military said in press briefings today that supplies of food
> and medicine have been stockpiled and will be delivered to the Iraqi
> people as soon as possible. But for the residents of Safwan, "soon"
> isn't soon enough.
>
> We were told that some people here have been wounded. And we saw one
> man taken to a car so they could drive him to Kuwait for treatment.
>
> Others told us that three or four people had been wounded during the
> first night of the war and people were very bitter about that.
>
> The notion that the military has things under control isn't quite
> clear in other aspects as well.
>
> Some very reliable Western journalists I spoke with, said they had
> traveled down a road that the British military told them was clear.
> Twenty-minutes later, they discovered land mines on the highway.
>
> Elsewhere, journalists were running into gunfire. This is all within
> about 6 miles of the Kuwaiti border.
>
> I couldn't help but feel that today was a dicey day, a very dicey day.

On 23 Mar 2003 at 3:09, Sander Faas wrote:

> BBC world just broadcasted a totally different story from a
> commentator saying reports from journalist travelling behind the
> troops tell the story of Iraqi civilians complaining about the
> American presents in their country and accusing the Americans they
> were just there to steal the Iraqi oil.

Mark Parkinson
Bodmin
Cornwall



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