The following is an archived copy of a message sent to a Discussion List run by the Campaign Against Sanctions on Iraq.

Views expressed in this archived message are those of the author, not of the Campaign Against Sanctions on Iraq.

[Main archive index/search] [List information] [Campaign Against Sanctions on Iraq Homepage]


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

SPECIAL SESSION DUTCH FOREIGN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE ON SANCTIONS




Good news :)


Press conference, documentary, special session of Dutch Foreign Affairs
Committee on the impact of the sanctions [unofficial translation, AEF]:

>From: Roberta Cowan, Press Officer Transnational Institute
& Kees Hudig, XminY Solidarity Foundation

Regarding:

1. Press Briefing in Nieuwspoort with Denis Halliday, former UN
Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, Phyllis Bennis, Sanctions Expert
& TNI Fellow, & Scott Ritter, former UN Weapons inspector, on
June 14th, 2000 @ 16:00 on the roll of the Dutch in the UN
Sanctions Committee, UN Security
Council and the Economic Sanctions on Iraq

2. Screening of the John Pilger Documentary: Paying the Price-
Killing the Children of Iraq (Channel 4, 2000) from 14:30 to 15:30 in
Nieuwspoort.

3. Special Session in Parliament called by the Foreign Affairs
Committee will
take place at 18:00 with expert testimony presented by Denis
Halliday, Phyllis Bennis, & Scott Ritter.

The formal debate in Parliament on the sanctions in Iraq will probably take
place the following week.

June 2000

10 years sanctions destroyed Iraq and kept the regime intact

14 June, Nieuwspoort, The Hague; pressconference on UN-sanctions against
Iraq on the eve of the debate in Dutch Parliament, including exhibition of
revealing documentary made by John Pilger.

Next year April it will be exactly ten years ago when the United Nations
Security Council with resolution 687 installed a total economic boycott
against Iraq.

Ever since the sanctions were adjusted several times - as with the
permission to Iraq to sell a certain amount of oil to finance food - but
didn't change significantly.

The effects on the land and the population have been desastrous. A number
of research and journalist accounts have shown the same picture. What was
once a wealthy country, is now a ruine. The middle class has been wiped
out, the social structure is disappeared and due to a lack of
infrastructure and medical provisions people are dying from malnutrition
and diseases which in other places around the world are easily cured. 

According to reports from UNICEF, of which the last one was issued last
year, a million people died from the sanctions, of which half are children.
The sanctions have claimed more casualties than the war which preceded it.
Also reports from the WHO and the International Red Cross showed that
malnutrition and mass mortality are the direct result of the sanctions.

The sanctions were more or less eased with the "oil-for-food"-program. This
didn't made a difference because the control-commission of the UN prohibits
the import of practically everything, including supplies for hospitals and
the reconstruction of infrastructure, medication and car-parts.

The British weekly The Economist describes the effects of the sanctions as
follows: "The sanctions destroyed almost the whole country: the health
system and education system has collapsed; the infrastructure rusted away;
the middle class sank away in poverty; the children are dying" (The
Economist, 25 March 2000)

The intended goal of the sanctions - to have the regime of Saddam Hussein
bow down - didn't come any nearer. In the opposite; there are a number of
signs that the control of the regime over the grounded down population is
bigger than ever and the embargo gave the opportunity to mobilise support
which wouldn't be there otherwise. The elite around Hussein and the
Baath-party are doing great, thanks to lucrative deals from black trade.

It is without doubt that the regime in Iraq is horrific and Saddam Hussein
is partly responsible for the situation in which the population has found
itself. However, the conclusion can only be that the economic sanctions
haven't worked and sort far-reaching by-effects. It is time to end them; it
is immoral and political not sustainable to held a whole nation hostage and
to torture them to change the country's mind.

The resistance against the sanctions is growing rapidly. Three of the five
members of Security Council favour the ending of the sanctions. In the
whole world, not the least in the United Sates, activities and
demonstrations can be seen to support this demand. Also the United Nations
sees itself confronted with resignation of high-placed employees because
they refuse to execute its policy. In February, Hans Von Sponeck resigned,
coordinator for the huminitarian support to Iraq. His predecessor, Denis
Halliday, who earlier took the same decision, like Richard Butler, head of
the weaponinspectors of the UN in Iraq. A day after the remarkable decision
of Von Sponeck, Jutta Burghardt resigned, the representative of the world
food program of the United Nations in Bagdad. Earlier Scott Ritter resigned
as weaponinspector of the UN in Iraq. 70 American Congressmen have asked
Clinton to suspend the sanctions. Secretary-General of the UN, Kofi Annan,
has called to "reconsider" the sanctions policy.

Two major powers are the driving forces behind the economic sanctions as
well as the continued military sanctions. The United States ahead, followed
by Great Britain. The Netherlands plays a special role in this. Since last
year, the Netherlands is chair of the Security Council. The Netherlands is
one of the few countries that support and defend the policy of the United
States and Great Britain. Within the Security Council, the members China,
France and Russia favour suspension of the sanctions. 

Next to this, the Netherlands is directly involved in the execution of the
sanctions, with its chairmanship of the Iraq-Sanction Committee of the
Security Council by Peter van Walsum. Van Walsum has shown a real havic
until now, who defends the policy in all its details.

Instead of aiding the United States which gets isolated increasingly, the
Netherlands should and must play a constructive role in the suspension of
the sanctions and to seek other ways. A call by Dutch MPs to Foreign
Minister Van Aartsen and commission member Van Walsum, would be a good step
in the right direction.

On Wednesday 14 June, John Pilger's documentary "Paying the Price, Killing
the Children of Iraq", will be shown in Nieuwspoort, The Hague, The
Netherlands. Journalists, members of Parliament, and other interested are
invited to see the film. The exhibition will start at 14.30 in the Frits
van der Poel-room.

Immediately following there will be a pressconference at 16.00 with former
head of the Humanitarian Program in Iraq Denis Halliday and Phyllis Bennis.
She is a member of the research-network Transnational Institute, and lead a
number of visits by members of the American Congress to Iraq to analyse the
consequences of the sanctions. Bennis wrote among other books Calling The
Shots (on the influence of the US on the UN) and the recently published
Iraq Under Siege.

On the same day, 14 June, from 18.00-19.00 a closed special session of the
Dutch Foreign Affairs Commission will take place. Invited experts will be
present, such as Denis Halliday, Phyllis Bennis and possibly also the
resigned weaponsinspector Scott Ritter.

---------------------------------------
>From: Roberta Cowan, Press Officer Transnational Institute
& Kees Hudig, XminY Solidarity Foundation

Regarding:

1. Press Briefing in Nieuwspoort with Denis Halliday, former UN
Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, Phyllis Bennis, Sanctions Expert
& TNI Fellow, & Scott Ritter, former UN Weapons inspector, on
June 14th, 2000 @ 16:00 on the roll of the Dutch in the UN
Sanctions Committee, UN Security
Council and the Economic Sanctions on Iraq

2. Screening of the John Pilger Documentary: Paying the Price-
Killing the Children of Iraq (Channel 4, 2000) from 14:30 to 15:30 in
Nieuwspoort.

3. Special Session in Parliament called by the Foreign Affairs
Committee will
take place at 18:00 with expert testimony presented by Denis
Halliday, Phyllis Bennis, & Scott Ritter.

The formal debate in Parliament on the sanctions in Iraq will probably take
place the following week.

[Dutch below]

Juni 2000

10 jaar sancties hebben Irak verwoest en het
regime intact gelaten.

14 juni, Nieuwspoort, Den Haag; persconferentie over VN-sancties
tegen Irak aan vooravond kamerdebat, inclusief voorvertoning
onthullende documentaire van John Pilger.

Volgend jaar april zal het precies tien jaar geleden zijn dat de
Veiligheidsraad van de Verenigde Naties met resolutie 687 een totale
economische boycot tegen Irak instelde. Sindsdien zijn de sancties enkele
malen aangepast - zoals met de toestemming aan Irak om een bepaalde
hoeveelheid olie te verkopen waarmee voedsel gefinancieerd zou kunnen
worden - maar niet wezenlijk veranderd.

Het effect op het land en de bevolking is desastreus geweest. Talloze
onderzoeken en journalistieke verslagen geven hetzelfde beeld. Wat eens
een welvarend land was, is nu een ruÔne. De middenklasse is weggevaagd, de
sociale structuur is zo goed als verdwenen en bij gebrek aan
infrastructuur en medische voorzieningen sterven mensen aan ondervoeding
en ziektes die elders op de wereld gemakkelijk te genezen zijn. Volgens
rapporten van UNICEF, waarvan het laatste vorig jaar verscheen, zijn een
miljoen mensen gestorven als gevolg van de sancties, waarvan de helft
kinderen. De sancties hebben aanzienlijk meer slachtoffers geŽist dan de
oorlog die eraan voorafging. Ook rapporten van de WHO en het
Internationale Rode Kruis tonen aan dat ondervoeding en massale sterfte
het directe gevolg van de sancties zijn.

De sancties werden enigszins verlicht met het 'oil for food'-programma.
Veel verschil heeft dit echter niet uitgemaakt aangezien de controle-
commissie van de VN de import van bijna alles verbiedt, inclusief
materiaal voor ziekenhuizen en de wederopbouw van de infrastructuur,
medicijnen en auto-onderdelen.

Het Britse weekblad The Economist beschrijft de effecten van de sancties
als volgt: "De sancties hebben het land bijna geheel verwoest: het systeem
van gezondheid en onderwijs is bezweken; de infrastructuur is weggeroest;
de middenklasse is in armoede weggezakt; de kinderen sterven." (The
Economist 25 maart 2000)

Het beoogde doel van de sancties - het laten buigen van het regime van
Saddam Hussein - is geen stap dichterbij gekomen. In tegendeel; er zijn
veel tekenen dat de controle van het regime over de uitgemergelde
bevolking groter dan ooit is en dat het embargo de gelegenheid biedt om
steun te moblisieren die er anders niet zou zijn. Het gaat de elite rondom
Hussein en de Baath-partij uitstekend, mede dankzij lucratieve inkomsten
uit zwarte handel.

Het staat buiten kijf dat het regime in Irak gruwelijk is en dat Saddam
Hussein mede- verantwoordelijk is voor de situatie waarin de bevolking
zich nu bevindt. De conclusie kan echter alleen maar zijn dat de
economische sancties niet werken en verstrekkende ongewenste bijeffecten
sorteren. Het is tijd om ze te beŽindigen; het is immoreel en politiek
niet langer houdbaar om een heel volk te gijzelen en te martelen in een
poging het regime van het land van gedachten te doen veranderen.

De weerstand tegen de sancties zwelt dan ook in snel tempo aan. Drie van
de vijf vaste leden van de Veiligheidsraad zijn voor beŽindiging van de
economische sancties. In de hele wereld, niet in het minst in de Verenigde
Staten, zijn ook activiteiten en demonstraties te zien om die eis kracht
bij te zetten. Ook de VN zelf ziet zich voortdurend geconfronteerd met
hoogeplaatste medewerkers die ontslag nemen omdat ze het beleid niet
langer wensen uit te voeren. In februari van dit jaar nam Hans Von Sponeck
ontslag, coŲrdinator voor de humanitaire hulp in Irak. Zijn voorganger,
Denis Halliday, had eerder hetzelfde besluit genomen, evenals Richard
Butler, hoofd van de wapeninspecteurs van de VN in Irak. Een dag na het
opzienbarende besluit van Von Sponeck, stapte Jutta Burghardt op, de
vertegenwoordigster van het wereldvoedselprogramma van de Verenigde Naties
in Bagdad. Scott Ritter stapte eerder al op als wapeninspecteur van de VN
in Irak. 70 Amerikaanse Congresleden hebben Clinton om opschorting van de
sancties gevraagd. Secretaris-Generaal van de VN, Kofi Annan, heeft
opgeroepen om het sanctie-beleid te "heroverwegen".

Twee grootmachten zijn de drijvende krachten achter zowel de economische
sancties als de voortdurende militaire acties. De Verenigde Staten voorop,
steevast gevolgd door Groot- BrittannÔe. Maar Nederland speelt in dit
geheel een heel bijzondere rol. Sinds vorig jaar is Nederland voorzitter
van de Veiligheidsraad. Nederland is een van de weinige landen die het
keiharde beleid van de VS en Groot-BrittanniŽ steunen en verdedigen.
Binnen de veiligheidsraad zijn de vaste leden China, Frankrijk en Rusland
voor opschorting van de sancties. Daarnaast is Nederland direct betrokken
bij de uitvoering van de sancties, in de vorm van het voorzitterschap van
het Irak- Sanctiecommissie van de Veiligheidsraad door Peter van Walsum.
Van Walsum heeft zich tot nu toe een regelrechte havik getoond, die het
gevoerde beleid op alle vlakken verdedigt.

In plaats van de helpende hand te bieden aan de Verenigde Staten die in
toenemende mate geÔsoleerd komt te staan, zou Nederland een constructieve
rol moeten en kunnen spelen bij het opschorten van de sancties en zoeken
naar andere wegen. Een oproep van de Nederlandse volksvertegenwoordigers
aan minister Van Aartsen en commissievoorzitter Van Walsum, zou een goede
eerste stap in die richting betekenen.

De gerenommeerde journalist John Pilger heeft zojuist een documentaire
gemaakt, Paying the Price, Killing the Children of Iraq, over de
achtergronden en gevolgen van de sancties. Deze werd kort geleden
uitgezonden door de Britse tv- zender Channel 4.

Op woensdag 14 juni zal een voorvertoning van de documentaire plaatsvinden
in Nieuwspoort.  Journalisten, parlementsleden en andere belangstellenden
worden uitgenodigd om de film te zien. De vertoning begint om 14.30 uur in
de Frits van der Poel-zaal

Aansluitend zal om 16.00 een persconferentie belegd worden met Voormalig
hoofd van het Humanitaire Programma in Irak Denis Halliday en Phyllis
Bennis. Zij is medewerkster van het onderzoeksnetwerk Transnational
Institute, en heeft onder meer de leiding gehad over een aantal bezoeken
van leden van het Amerikaanse Congress aan Irak om de gevolgen van de
sancties te analyseren. Bennis schreef onder meer de boeken Calling The
Shots (over de invloed van de VS op de VN) en het recent verschenen Iraq
Under Siege.

Op dezelfde dag - 14 juni - zal van 18.00-19.00 een (besloten, dus alleen
voor kamerleden toegankelijke) speciale sessie van de commissie
Buitenlandse Zaken van de 2e Kamer plaatsvinden. Genodigde experts zullen
daar aanwezig zijn, zoals Denis Halliday, Phyllis Bennis en wellicht ook
de opgestapte wapeninspecteur Scott Ritter.

Wij hopen dat u op de persconferentie aanwezig kunt zijn. Indien u van
tevoren meer informatie wenst te ontvangen, kunnen wij u een map met
recente artikelen toesturen. Ook bestaat er de mogelijkheid om
afzonderlijke afspraken te maken met Phillys Bennis en Dennis Halliday.
Indien wij behulpzaam kunnen zijn met contact te leggen met andere experts
die op dit moment niet persoonlijk aanwezig kunnen zijn, doen wij dat met
plezier.

Indien gewenst kunnen wij u daarnaast een kopie van John Pilger's
documentaire op video doen toekomen. In de persmap vindt u tevens een
lijst met recent verschenen boeken en andere bronnen over de kwestie, die
gedeeltelijk ook bij ons verkrijgbaar zijn.  Voor nadere informatie kunt u
terecht bij:

Transnational Institute
Roberta Cowan-Press Officer
Paulus Potterstraat 20
1071 DA Amsterdam
tel. 020-6626608
fax 020-6757176
mobile: 06 15 220 131
roberta.cowan@tni.org
http://www.tni.org

De vertoning in Nieuwspoort wordt georganiseerd door TNI, XminY
Solidariteitsfonds en Documentaireprogramma Club In



--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
This is a discussion list run by the Campaign Against Sanctions on Iraq
For removal from list, email soc-casi-discuss-request@lists.cam.ac.uk
Full details of CASI's various lists can be found on the CASI website:
http://welcome.to/casi



[Campaign Against Sanctions on Iraq Homepage]